Wednesday, July 30, 2014

How to Lose a Client in One Visit

A Contractor Should Keep a Client's Home Clean.

I was headed out the door to go see a long term client when I saw the same client post the following on Facebook:

"Is this activity going to create any dust?" Is there a part of this question that is unclear? Especially when it turns out the dust in this case is beyond something insignificant.... I am steamed beyond belief, and I specifically asked because an ounce of prevention goes a long way here. I have drop cloths and plastic tarps always available, although I would expect a professional to bring their own with them. Imagine if I treated my clients this way!"

I was like uh oh and replied back.  "Can I still come over?"  She assured me it was ok.  When I got there, the offending contractor was still there.  When we got far enough away she confided her true feelings about the matter - something I wish I could had a hidden camara for because she really laid into them. With wide eyes and disbelief, I listened to how everything played out.  Then I did what I needed to do and left.  Later that evening she followed up her former facebook post with this:

"Cleaning, cleaning and more cleaning. Thank you so much, unnamed-electrical-contractor, for giving me the opportunity to PAY you and then being allowed the pleasure of cleaning and disinfecting the entire house when I had just done so two days ago. I know I'm home a lot; I know I clean a lot; however, I generally don't plan on having to clean the entire square footage of this house because of your mistake. Next time, it might be helpful to let the homeowner know a "simple" exhaust fan replacement really entails two hours of attic work (discarding a lot of insulation in the hallway during this process) and then cutting into the plaster ceilings in the master bath and bedroom. Again, many thanks for using my towels as drop cloths. Okay, I inquire the second time: any electrical contractor referrals? Particularly someone who might tell me if it's going to create a little dust (especially knowing our unique situation) and -- hello! -- bring drop cloths inside?"

I commented that I was sorry she was going through that.  She replied, "I'm so frustrated, Steve. I saw how close the new exhaust fan was to a new grille my awesome HVAC guy just had to work on. With the mess, I started worrying about the work today compromising the new AC unit in the attic. Awesome Jeremy is coming tomorrow. I am so sick I just learned he also installs exhaust fans and kitchen hoods. Wish I had just called him to do this had I known (he installed both of our HVAC units and is a top company I refer (just like Wood Window Makeover)). He just installed an entire unit in our attic and made 95% less of a mess removing and installing an entire HVAC unit in the attic than today's "simple" exhaust fan install. Plus, he brought new drop cloths. I guess I'm spoiled between you and him!"



We are far from perfect - but drop cloths, plastic, a broom, HEPA vac, a swiffer and baby wipes go a long way.  Rule #1 - Protect the Client.  This story is going to go the "How to lose a client in one visit" playbook.  

Thursday, April 24, 2014



It's here!  The 2014 Historic Homes Workshop is this weekend.  Programs are here, shirts have been delivered.  Chairs come tomorrow and by the time they get here the shop should be all cleaned and ready to go.  Why do we have the workshops?  So hopefully you will never do to your house what's shown above with that two story house.  Please no. Come learn why that's bad.  Doors open at 9am Saturday morning, and 12:30 Sunday afternoon.  Get your discounted advanced registration at shop.woodwindowmakeover.com

Monday, January 13, 2014

Storm Windows for a Hyde Park House

Here's a few pics of some storm windows we just made for a client.  Made 1/4" laminated glass, these are designed to take a blow.  Hopefully they never need to.  They should also make the original double hung windows on this old Hyde Park house more energy efficient. 



Friday, January 10, 2014

Sash to Jacksonville

Here's three complete 1-lite sashes for the bottom half of a double hung window. They have been disassembled into their component parts for easy shipping. Made with traditional mortise and tenon joinery, the parts are labeled for easy assembly. They are complete with holes for the ropes. Cost to ship from Tampa to Jacksonville - $25.  Not bad.

White board from an historic window

This is a good idea.  Paint the back white and, viola!  Trendy whiteboard!

Thursday, January 09, 2014

Looking up to Jason

Jason consistently impresses us all with his quick wit and creative solutions.   Maybe that's why the crew looked at him thus in this pic.

Working up high in a cigar factory building.

Its windy and rainy, but we're still having a good time. 

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Shop photos mid August.

Just a couple of shots of work at the shop as we getting up and running in mid August.